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Disability information and resources for employers

Resource material designed specifically to assist employers is freely available.

Useful websites

Other employers' experiences

One way for employers to increase their ‘disability confidence” is to learn and benefit from success stories of other employers who have employed people with a disability. Websites with examples of New Zealand and Australia employers effectively accommodating disabilities include:

  • Diversityworksnz.org.nz (external link) has case studies which include employers who have employed people with disabilities.
  • The Australian JobAccess Site (external link) has an extensive collection of accounts from employers who have had positive experiences employing disabled people.
  • Point of View Productions (external link) How to make the most of a diverse pool of talent by using the skills of people with disabilities. Successful businesses tell you how they did it and why it worked well for them.
  • Employer networks (such as Be.accessible (external link) ) for employers who share the vision of improving utilisation of the resources offered by people with disabilities.
  • ‘Works for Me’ (external link) is a YouTube video for employers, chambers of commerce and employment groups showing how employing someone with a disability can have a positive impact on the culture of their business.
  • The Think Differently website (external link) has a DVD for employers – “Works for Me”. The people interviewed in this DVD are employers who recognise that disabled people can have a positive impact on the culture and success of their business. It features employees in a range of occupations – from lawyers and IT specialists to car groomers and administration.

Mental health resources

Mindful Employer Line Managers' Resource

One of the areas that employers find difficult is working with people who have mental health issues. It is likely that as an employer, at least one member of your staff may at some point have a long or short term mental health issue because 3 in 10 employees experience mental health issues. This resource provides practical information and advice from managers in organisations in the U.K. covering:

  • Mental health conditions & recovery
  • Mentally healthy workplaces
  • The importance of talking in the workplace
  • Keeping in touch during sickness absence
  • Planning a return to work & reasonable adjustments
  • Sources of other information, help and training

Work related stress perspective and tips

The following information provides some important perspective around work related stress and some tips for more effective management of work related stress.

Work related stress (external link)  on the UK Health and Safety Executive website.

The Well-Being Resource Book for New Managers: An Essential Guide to Mental Health and Wellbeing

If you're new to management, you can get ideas from this UK resource to help you promote the well-being of you and others. Topics include:

  • What it means to be a Good Manager
  • Stress Management
  • Managing Sickness Absence
  • Useful Sources of Information (UK based)

It is available online. The Well-Being Resource Book for New Managers. (external link)

Supported employment agencies

Supported employment agencies are located across New Zealand and help disabled people to get and keep a job.

Workbridge

As well as administering government funding schemes to support disabled people into open employment, training or self-employment, Workbridge (external link) also places disabled people directly into work.

New Zealand Disability Support Network

On the ASENZ website (external link) you can find more information such as the agencies closest to you, and links to specialist supported employment agencies listed by region, by vacancy or by disability.

Workwise Employment Agency

Workwise Employment Agency (external link) supports people with mental health conditions to return to work and to stay in work.

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Page last revised: 16 July 2021

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