Ethical and sustainable work practices

Implementing and demonstrating ethical and sustainable work practices is essential to future proofing business.

While many New Zealanders can’t conceive of workers being treated poorly, it is becoming clearer that exploitation, especially of migrants, is happening in New Zealand. Employers are being held to account for exploitative conduct that ranges from wage underpayments and unlawful deductions, to forced labour and human trafficking.

As a result, there are increasing demands from stakeholders, including customers, employees, investors and consumers, for businesses to show ethical and sustainable work practices in relation to how workers are treated within their organisation and supply chains.

What are ethical and sustainable work practices

Demand for ethical and sustainable work practices

These expectations apply to all parties who employ or contract people in their businesses. These include, but are not limited to, organisations acting as employers, franchisors, investors and procurers, businesses providing labour on hire, individuals acting as directors or managers, and work brokers.

What it means for you and your business

It is essential for you to understand and apply ethical and sustainable work practices. Whether you employ your own staff, work in procurement, are a franchisor, place workers in other businesses, or provide financial investment to other businesses, cases of non-compliance in your business and/or supply chain can expose and damage your organisation’s reputation and branding.

This includes:

  • harming the quality of products and services that you provide
  • damaging the goodwill and loyalty you have earned from your customers
  • negatively impacting on demand for your goods and services
  • not being able to sell your products and services to resellers or other businesses (eg government, retailers or wholesalers)
  • reducing your revenue, profit, financial viability, and the market value of your business.
  • affecting your ability to retain quality staff
  • affecting the health, safety, productivity and wellbeing of workers.

It is essential you have systems and processes in place to identify and eliminate worker exploitation in your business and supply chain. This will help ensure you can meet your stakeholders’ expectations and reduce the risks to the viability of your business.

Employment New Zealand has developed resources to help you consider the requirements to be a viable and sustainable business. 

What are ethical and sustainable work practices

Businesses that don’t understand and apply ethical and sustainable work practices are risking their future financial viability.

Demand for ethical and sustainable work practices

In New Zealand and across the world, demand is increasing for businesses to look after the wellbeing of their employees.

Employers assuring ethical and sustainable work practices

Employers are responsible for ensuring their staff are treated fairly and provided with their employment rights.

Procurers assuring ethical and sustainable work practices in supply chains

Procurers play a key role in assuring that workers within supply chains are treated fairly, including compliance with employment standards.

Franchisors assuring ethical and sustainable work practices

To reduce brand reputation risk, a franchisor should implement and ensure their franchisees operate using ethical and sustainable work practices.

Recruiters and employment brokers assuring ethical and sustainable work practices

Recruitment and employment brokering agencies, and HR recruitment personnel have a duty of care to ensure that their clients have ethical and sustainable work practices.

Page last revised: 03 July 2020

Still haven't found what you're looking for?